I don’t normally respond to opposing arguments, nor delete them, because a dialogue is necessary…

I don’t normally respond to opposing arguments, nor delete them, because a dialogue is necessary and everyone who has different experience should have them validated- mine are no more authentic or personal than yours.

In this instance, however, I’d like to clarify- we all have things we don’t like about ourselves, but there is a distinct difference between an insecurity, an gender dysphoria. I am not diminishing, not minimizing people with insecurities over their body shape, size or build- in fact- i pay great respect to that in the article you’ve commented on. Speaking for myself, solely, I can attest to the fact that my dysphoria, my mind in full disagreement with my body, and my desperation to be recognized and acknowledged for how I preferred to be seen versus how I believed the word saw me did grave damage to my self worth. Much of my ability to experience genuine happiness hinged on whether or not I was able to move through society without being heckled, stared at, laughed at or worse, violently attacked. Women with abundant hair on their arms may not like it, but they’re not living in fear of being killed due to it being a gender indicator.

This piece is to reaffirm, uplift and validate the transgender community who have suffered in the same ways that I and many other have as a result of our appearance not falling between the goal posts of specific masculinity or femininity. It was not meant to reduce the plight of cis people who feel inadequate by comparison to their fellow cis peers. They do not, however, suffer the same, long term emotional damage that a trans person living in the wrong body does. I understand you don’t agree with that assessment, and that’s perfectly okay.

Powered by WPeMatico